The Martha Bassett Show

Mollie O'Brien & Rich Moore

Sometimes the story is just about the ordinary. No big bang, no big gig, no big promoter or writer hearing the band and telling the rest of the world. Sometimes the story is just about doing what you do and keeping at it. In the case of Mollie O'Brien and Rich Moore it means 30 years of marriage, two kids, numerous day jobs, and making music together and apart.

They met in 1981 at the Denver Folklore Center on April Fool’s Day and married a few years later. At the time they were involved in their own bands and working solidly all over Colorado - Mollie was singing with Prosperity JazzBand, a vintage swing band which featured local luminary Washboard Chaz among others; Rich was playing bass with the rock-steady blues band, The Late Show. Within a year Mollie joined The Late Show, and they attracted notice outside the bar band scene and began playing Colorado blues festivals and concerts. A few years of marriage and two daughters later, things began to change. O’Brien quit the blues band and Moore got a day job that he held until both of their daughters graduated from college. Now, here’s how things turned out.

Grammy Award winner Mollie O'Brien became known to the rest of the world as a singer's singer when, in 1988, she and her brother Tim released the first of three critically-acclaimed albums for Sugar Hill Records (Take Me Back, Remember Me and Away Out On The Mountain). Eventually, Mollie recorded five equally well-received solo albums (Tell It True, Big Red Sun and Things I Gave Away for Sugar Hill Records, and I Never Move Too Soon and Everynight In The Week for Resounding Records). Additionally, she was a regular on the nationally-syndicated radio show, “A Prairie Home Companion” from 2001 through 2005. She's long been known as a singer who doesn't recognize a lot of musical boundaries, and audiences love her fluid ability to make herself at home in any genre while never sacrificing the essence of the song she tackles. O’Brien has primarily focused her efforts on the fading art of interpretation and the end result is a singer at the very top of her game who is not afraid to take risks both vocally and in the material she chooses.

Husband Rich Moore has busied himself in the Colorado music scene for many years. While staying home with the kids when Mollie & Tim toured, he held a day job and continued to perform locally with a variety of Colorado favorites, including Pete Wernick and Celeste Krenz. Not only is Moore known to produce some of the funniest onstage running commentary, he's also a powerhouse guitar player who can keep up with O'Brien's twists and turns from blues to traditional folk to jazz to rock and roll. He creates a band with just his guitar and, as a result, theirs is an equal partnership.

O’Brien and Moore’s first duet CD, a live recording titled 900 Baseline (Remington Road Records) was released in 2006. Their first studio project, Saints & Sinners (Remington Road Records), was released to nationwide acclaim in 2010. In January 2014 they'll release their followup, Love Runner (Remington Road Records). Both studio projects were produced by Lyons, CO ace arranger and bassist, Eric Thorin, who often joins them onstage for their live shows. All three CDs showcase their talent for unlocking the secrets to a diverse array of songs in authoritative yet very fun and unusual arrangements.

For their latest release, Love Runner, they again enlisted their talented friends, Glenn Taylor (pedal steel), John Magnie (piano and accordion), Eric Moon (piano and organ) and Marc Dalio (drums). When one s!ong called out for a musical saw, they were lucky enough to discover the wondrous Lesley Kernochan. ?

Irish fiddler Jessie Burns put her lyrical stamp on a few folk songs. And, happily for O’Brien and Moore, ?their daughters Brigid and Lucy were able to make the date for the background vocal session.?Love Runner features three songs written by Mollie and Rich - the rocking title track, the autobiographical 40’s swing-like “Went Back Home,” and a powerhouse turn at the traditional gospel song, “Don’t Let The Devil Ride.” Once again, they have unearthed some hidden gems: Tom Paxton’s newly-written “Central Square” is about first love; Robin and Linda Williams’s and Jerome Clark’s “Green Summertime” is a gorgeous paean to a small town world called home; Hal Cannon’s “Just Go” places the listener squarely in the front seat next to a woman leaving a ruinous relationship in the dust. O’Brien and Moore also put their stamp on the inimitable Dave Van Ronk’s “Sunday Street” and on Randy Newman’s eerie “Suzanne” - both songs normally sung from a male point of view but, when given Mollie’s gimlet-eyed take, become even more unique for their devil-may-care breeziness and swagger.

The band assembled for these sessions (all old friends), are listeners and never let their parts overshadow the lyrics and guitar sounds. Minimal preproduction rehearsals made for fewer preconceptions and once they were all together playing live in the studio the band made bold leaps to create the mood Mollie, Rich and Eric wanted. There’s definitely a locked-in feeling you get with each track - something that can only happen live and only with such intuitive and responsive musicians. And as for Eric, sitting in the producer’s chair, he found that sometimes departing from the master plan can create unique outcomes for every take.

Says Thorin, “Every time Mollie sings you'd better be recording. There are no scratch tracks. Rich is a favorite co-conspirator and sublime orchestrator on the guitar. They don't take themselves or anyone else too seriously or let anyone else ride that train. The studio banter is cutting, joyful and in the moment and they carry that to the stage with astonishing ease.”

Most of the tracks on Love Runner have to do with the universal theme of home: leaving it and family behind; missing it; never wanting to go back; finding it in surprising places all over the world; wondering what kind of “home” awaits us in the life after this one. O’Brien and Moore let us know via their choice of material that they are not afraid to take risks. It’s almost as if they’re telling us that at this stage in their lives, they are at home with their musical selves - they can do whatever they want and they don’t care if the rest of the world agrees with them.

To quote the one and only Cher, "In this business, it takes time to be really good." Mollie O'Brien and Rich Moore are proof that age is no obstacle to making timeless, original and inventive music.

Learn more at https://mollieobrien.com

Also Appearing:
Bob Sinclair

Sinclair first came into the national spotlight when he was selected as a Merlefest Emerging Artist and as a three time award winner of the NC Grassroots Artists awards for songwriting and performance. 

Q: What is your relationship to the music you perform? What draws you to this style?

A: I like that you call this country-influenced swing. I think that is a fairly apt description. My musical tastes are wide and varied – my playlist includes old country music to classical to bluegrass, pop and jazz. But I do like how the jazz and swing chords sound on the guitar. There is so much space for melody in those chords. Also, I have a Southern storyteller’s heart, and in each song I like to make sure that the story I tell would be interesting whether it had a melody or not. I only began to write songs until after I learned a jazz chord progression and then the songs began to flow. So “country” is the right description for the songs and “swing” is much of the flavor of the music.

You’ve won some awards for songwriting and performance. Part of songwriting is telling a story. How do you think stories are told better through music?

I have won three North Carolina Grassroots grants for songwriting. I think I am a natural storyteller. I also have a knack for writing good melodies. I would say that stories can be enhanced when told through music. When I find a melody that creates an emotion and that feeling fits the emotion of the story, then everything becomes much more powerful. I have a song called “Romeo” and the melody and lyrics fit perfectly together in that song. There is always someone in the audience that will tear up on that one. I attribute that to the strong combination of how the melody makes you feel and the story that it embraces.

- from the Statesville Record & Landmark


Learn more at https://www.bobsinclairmusic.com

Debra Reuter-Pivetta & Federico Pivetta

Flutist Debra Reuter-Pivetta enjoys a diverse career as soloist, chamber artist, orchestral player, and teacher. A winner in the 1999 Concert Artists Guild Competition, she holds top prizes several international competitions. Ms. Reuter-Pivetta has performed as concerto soloist with many orchestras across the United States and Europe. She is a founding member of the critically acclaimed flute, viola, and harp trio, the Fire Pink Trio. The Trio released their debut CD, “Poetry in Motion”, in 2015 on the MSR Classics label. Ms. Reuter-Pivetta has recorded chamber works by Undine Smith Moore, William Banfield, and Anthony Kelley on the Albany label. She has recorded works by Böhm, Bozza, Saint-Saëns, Guiot and Burton with her husband, pianist Federico Pivetta. Their critically acclaimed CD has aired frequently on public radio stations across the country. Performance highlights for the Pivetta Duo include concerts in Chicago, New York City, Italy, and a 75 city nationwide tour. Debra Reuter-Pivetta is the principal flutist with the Greensboro Symphony Orchestra and the flute instructor at Salem College.

Federico Pivetta is a versatile pianist with a unique mastery of both classical and jazz styles. An active accompanist, chamber musician and teacher, he has made numerous recital appearances with his wife, flutist Debra Reuter-Pivetta, and their CD, “Passion and Romance” has received numerous accolades. In 1999 they were winners of the Concert Artists Guild Competition, winning the Community Concerts Performance Prize. The year 2000 marked the beginning of an extensive concert tour across the United States. He has also accompanied renowned tenor saxophonist James Houlik in concerts throughout the United States, Caribbean, and Europe. His collaborations with various jazz groups have resulted in several radio and television appearances and many recording projects. Other highlights include performances with jazz greats Ernie Watts, Reggie Workman, Al Jarreau and Arturo Sandoval. Mr. Pivetta is an active freelance musician and maintains a private teaching studio as well. Federico Pivetta studied at the North Carolina School of the Arts and his teachers have included Eric Larsen, Anne Epperson and Barbara Lister-Sink.

Questions about the show?

For more information about this show or about the Reeves Theater, including location, directions, food, and accessibility, please visit the theater website or call the theater at (336) 258-8240.

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